Campus living at Hampton University features an attractive mix of historic and modern residence halls that are sure to match your style. Click any of the halls to learn more.

Women's Residence Halls Men's Residence Halls
Kelsey Hall* Dubois Hall
Kennedy Hall* Harkness Hall
Moton Hall* Holmes Hall
Twitchell Hall* James Hall
Virginia-Cleveland Hall* Pierce Hall
Multi Use Facility Wilder Hall
McGrew Towers Marshall Hall
Dubois Hall Winona Hall
Holly Tree Inn
Modulars
White Hall
Stone Manor
Davidson Hall
Continuing Education Center (CEC)
   
*Freshmen Facilities

Kelsey Hall

Kelsey Hall

Kelsey Hall was a gift from Mrs. Clarence Kelsey in memory of her husband who was a former Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees. Kelsey Hall is a four-story residence hall. There are two lobbies, south and north, which may be designated for study groups and socializing. This building is also equipped with a kitchenette and snack area.

Capacity: 99
Number of Floors: Four (no elevator service)
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds, desk, closet, chest, chest of drawers for each resident and a shared mirror.

Director: Canela Eatman

Davidson Hall

Davidson Hall

Davidson Hall was named for Olivia America Davidson-Washington, who was the wife of Booker T. Washington.  Students have the use of a study lounge, kitchenette, and a spacious lobby with a waterfront view.

Capacity: 145 Number of Floors: Four
No Air Conditioning
Rooms feature: Extra long twin beds, closet, chest, chest of drawers for each resident and a shared mirror.

Director: Lowanda Jarrett

Kennedy Honors Hall

Kennedy Hall

Kennedy Hall, built in 1918 by students, was funded by Mrs. John S. Kennedy in memory of her husband. This residence hall overlooks the center of campus. Kennedy Hall is equipped with central air, a snack room, and two study rooms furnished with study carrels. This building has been designated for freshman scholars only.

Capacity: 50
Number of Floors: Four (no elevator service)
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds (extended twin-size available upon request),
desks, closet, chest of drawers for each resident and a shared mirror.

Director: Patricia Boddie

Moton Hall

Moton Hall

Moton Hall, completed in 1964, was named in honor of Dr. Robert Moton, the former Hampton administrator and successor to our most illustrious alumnus, Booker T. Washington, who became President of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. This building is equipped with central air, kitchenette, study room and a TV lounge.

Capacity: 177
Number of Floors: Four
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Extended twin beds, desks, closets, chest of drawers for each resident and a shared mirror.

Director: Annie Wilkins

Twitchell Hall

Twitchell Hall

Twitchell Hall is named in honor of Margaret W. Twitchell, a former Dean of Women. Twitchell Hall residents can enjoy a snack room, central air, recreation room, and a large lobby that holds at least 300 students, a waiting area, and modern kitchen facilities. There are five floors containing both single and double occupancies. Twitchell’s waterfront location creates a peaceful environment that is conducive to the lifestyle of any Hampton Woman.

Capacity: 230
Number of Floors: Five
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Extra long twin beds, desks, closet, and chest of drawers for each resident and a shared mirror.

Director: Wilhelmenia Sumner

Virginia-Cleveland Hall

Cleveland Hall

As Hampton University's oldest women's residence hall, Cleveland Hall is a historical and beautiful building built on the bank of the Hampton River. Virginia Cleveland Hall is one of two buildings on campus designed by Richard Morris Hunt, a distinguished 19th century architect. The other building designed by Hunt is the Academy Building. Hunt is best known for designing the pedestal for the Statue of Liberty and the Biltmore Estate, and for his work on the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There is an abundance of history shared by many who have dwelled here in the past. Virginia Cleveland's rooms allow the residents ample space for living. The upstairs lobby is now used for a study area. The building features a common area which includes a snack room, microwave, refrigerator and stove that the students may use.

Capacity: 233
Number of Floors: Four (no elevator service)
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Extra long twin beds, desk, wardrobe, chest of drawers and a mirror.

Director: Faith Hargrove

Multi Use Facility

The Multi Use Facility is an honors facility with large double rooms for 82 seniors. Four residents share the spacious bathrooms and occupy the second and third floors of this facility. The Offices of Alumni Affairs, Career Counseling and Planning Center, and University Relations occupy the first floor.

Director: Leslie Stephens

McGrew Towers

McGrew Hall

McGrew Towers was built in 1982, and was named after Hampton alumna Hattie Smith McGrew. McGrew is a nine-story residential hall, designed on the concept of four or five rooms centered around a common lounge and bath facilities.

Capacity: 302
Number of Floors: Nine with elevator service
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds, desk, closet, chest, chest of drawers for each resident and an individual mirror.

Director: Belinda Riddick

Moorings Hall

Moorings Hall

"Moorings" was built by Robert Curtis Ogden for his daughter and son-in-law, Alexander Purves, who was treasurer of Hampton Institute. It was constructed in 1903. Prior to its use as a residence hall, it was used as the alumni guest house and faculty housing. The College Museum was once housed in the Moorings and many excellent student and professional artist had exhibits there.

Capacity: 29
Number of Floors: Four
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Extended twin beds, desks, closets, chest of drawers for each resident and a shared mirror.

Director: Johnette Elder

Holly Tree Inn

Holly Tree Inn

Holly Tree was constructed in 1888. The facility was designed and built by Hampton students. A three-story residence hall, the Inn has served as a residence hall for single women, faculty/staff members, and currently for students. There is an adjoining dining room for faculty/staff and visitors.

Capacity: 22
Number of Floors: Three
No Air Conditioning
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds, desks, closet, and chest of drawers for each resident.

Hostess: Doris Jones

Modulars

Modulars

Modulars is an independent living facility that is equipped with a bathroom in each room.

Capacity: 48
Number of Floors: Three
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Extra long twin beds, desk, wardrobe, chest of drawers for each resident.

Director: Patricia Boddie

Marshall Hall

Marshall Hall

Marshall Hall was known as St. Martin’s Catholic Church until Hampton University purchased it for a male residence hall, when it became known as St. Martin’s Honors Hall. The male residents, during the 1990-1991 academic year, made a proposal to rename the hall a after prominent African American. Therefore, in 1992 the residence hall was renamed in honor of the first African-American Supreme Court Justice, Thurgood Marshall. Beginning in the Fall Semester, 2010, Marshall Hall will house upperclass male students.

Capacity: 60
Number of Floors: Two
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds, desk, wardrobe, and individual mirrors.

Winona Hall

Winona Hall

Winona Hall was formerly the nurses' quarters for persons working at Dixie Hospital, located across Queen Street near the main entrance to the campus. It was acquired in 1960 and converted into a women's residence hall and named in honor of Winona Lodge, a dormitory for Indian girls constructed in 1882. The programming objective for Winona Lodge was to foster the development of self-esteem and self-worth among the girls, which would enable them to lead lives of service when they left Hampton. Winona Lodge was demolished in 1950 to make room for a larger women's residence hall. For sixty-eight years, however, the Lodge was an integral part of residential life at Hampton. Dixie Hospital was a building acquired by the University and converted into Queen Street Honors Residence Hall. Queen Street Hall was demolished in 2009 to provide a part of the site for the newly built Hampton University Cafeteria. Winona Hall has undergone extensive renovation and refurbishing and was re-opened in the fall semester, 2010, as a residence hall for male students.

Winona Hall is a 77 capacity, two level residence hall featuring double occupancy and single occupancy rooms.

The rooms feature extended twin beds, desks, dressers, built in closets, a technology package for internet and cable, and individual central air conditioning/heating controls.

Community facilities include a restroom and showers on each floor, laundry facilities, kitchen, common room, billiards table, vending room, and a lobby with seating.

Director: Andrew E. Morrison

White Hall

White Hall

White Hall was built in 2002, and is named for Dr. Gladys Hope Franklin-White. Residents must have a 2.8 GPA or higher to reside in this honors facility.

Capacity: 178
Number of Floors: Four
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds, desks, wardrobe, night stand, chest of drawers for each resident and a shared mirror.

Director: Ruth Charity

Stone Manor

Stone Manor

Stone Manor was a gift from Mrs. Valerie Stone of Massachusetts in memory of her husband Samuel Stone. This Victorian style building was constructed in part by Hampton Students in 1882. In 2008 this facility underwent major renovations. These renovations included the conversion of second floor offices to residence hall living space.

Capacity: 75
Number of Floors: Two
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Extended twin beds, desks, closets, chest of drawers for each resident and a mirror.

Director: Nadine Gregory

Dubois Hall

Dubois Hall

Dubois Hall was completed in 1970 and named after Dr. W. E. B. Dubois, a brilliant African American who was the first of his race to receive a doctorate from Harvard University. This residence hall has a spacious lobby and study rooms. Residents must have a 3.0 GPA or higher to reside in this facility. This is currently a co-ed facility with males on the first three floors.

Capacity: 202
Number of Floors: Seven
Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds, desks, wardrobe, and chest of drawers for each resident and an individual mirror.

Director: Denise Griffin

Harkness Hall

Harkness Hall

Harkness Hall was completed in 1954 with funding provided through the United Negro College Fund, and named in honor of Standard Oil billionaire and philanthropist Edward Stephen Harkness. Harkness Hall serves as a freshman facility and can accommodate 249 residents. Harkness features large rooms, internet and cable connections in each room, community restroom facilities on each wing, a weight and fitness room, and a big screen television in the lobby. Recent renovations (completed August 2008) include central air conditioning and heating, new smoke detection and fire alarm/sprinkler systems, flooring, furniture, and room doors w/security closures.

Capacity: 249
Number of Floors: Four with elevator service
Central Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: extended twin beds, technology package for internet and cable, smoke detectors and sprinkler fire/alarm system, individual wardrobes w/securable drawers (student must provide own padlocks), computer-ready desks, dressers w/mirrors, night stands, under-bed storage, and large community restrooms and shower facilities on each wing of each floor.

Director: Raymond Cullen, Jr.

Holmes Hall

Holmes Hall

Holmes Hall was named in honor of Dr. Wendell P. Holmes, Jr., class of 1943, Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Trustees and stalwart supporter of Hampton University. Holmes Hall opened in 2002 following its dedication during the annual Founders Day ceremony. This facility houses upper-class male honors students in a modern, comfortable setting that is conducive to academic achievement and social interaction.

Capacity: 105
Number of Floors: Three
Central Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Extended twin beds, desks, dressers, wardrobes with mirrors, and technology package for internet and cable..
Room Types: Double occupancy and a limited number of single occupancy rooms are available Study room, individual bathrooms on first floor. Some private restrooms, some shared community restrooms and shower facilities.

Director: David Wright
Graduate Associate Director: Derek Wise

James Hall

James Hall

James Hall was completed in 1914 by students enrolled in the Trade School Program as a gift to the University from Mrs. Ellen S. James, wife of philanthropist Daniel Willis James, an important New York City merchant and financier. Originally erected as the only male facility on the campus, James Hall serves as a freshman facility and can accommodate 191 residents. The University completed a two and one-half million dollar renovation project during the summer of 2002. Renovations included the installation of central air and heating systems, full internet and cable connections in each room, security, smoke and fire detection/alarm systems, new furniture, mini blinds and other amenities. The renovation project added another phase during the summer of 2007 with the installation of new window systems.

Capacity: 191 Number of Floors: Five (no elevator service)
Central Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: extended twin beds, technology package for internet and cable, individual wardrobes, computer-ready desks, dressers w/mirrors, night stands, under-bed storage; double and triple capacity rooms, with a limited number of single rooms, most located on the fifth floor. Large community restroom and shower facilities are located between each floor of the residence.

Director: Dwight Tennyson
Graduate Associate Director: Prince Nwala

Pierce Honors Hall

Pierce Hall

Moses Pierce Honors Residence Hall for incoming Presidential and Trustee Scholars was erected in 1893 by Hampton students enrolled in the Trade School. Originally constructed to house the Pierce Machine Shop, it was considered a state-of-the-art facility for teaching the machinist’s trade. It has served as a residence hall for over thirty years and once housed the administrative offices of the Dean of Men and the Upward Bound Program. Renovations completed in 1995 included the installation of central air conditioning and heating, internet and cable connections, and new furnishings for the rooms and flooring. Pierce hall can accommodate thirty-six residents and staff.

Capacity: 36
Number of Floors: Three (no elevator service)
Central Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: Standard twin beds (extended twin-size available upon request), desks, dressers, wardrobes with mirrors, technology package for internet and cable, and large community restrooms and shower facilities

Director: Robert Riddick

Wilder Hall

Wilder Hall

Named in honor of the honorable L. Douglas Wilder, the nation’s first elected black governor, Wilder Hall opened during the Annual Founders Day celebration, January 25, 1990. This facility houses upper-class male students in a modern, comfortable setting that is conducive to academic achievement and social interaction. Situated on the beautiful waterfront of the campus, many rooms have a view of the Hampton River and Bay. Residence rooms are spacious with full technology packages for internet and cable, twin beds, wardrobes, dressers with mirrors and individual study desks.

Capacity: 191
Number of Floors: Five
Central Air Conditioning/Heating
Rooms feature: twin beds, desks, dressers, wardrobes with mirrors, and a technology package for internet and cable.
Room Types: Double occupancy
Community showers and restroom facilities on each floor

Director: Robert E. Jones, MA
Graduate Associate Director: Emmanuel Anderson

Continuing Education Center (CEC)

The Continuing Education Center (CEC) is a three story structure that was built in 1926 by Trade School Students. This upperclassman facility has double rooms with semi-private baths.

Director: Doris Jones